Welcome to Randolph County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network!

 

Welcome to Randolph County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide free resources for genealogical and historical researchers.

To share your Randolph County, Alabama genealogy or history information, send an email to alghn@outlook.com - we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information to share for other Alabama Counties, visit the Alabama Genealogy & History Network and go to the appropriate county.

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About Randolph County, Alabama...

The Alabama General Assembly created Randolph County on December 18, 1832, from lands acquired from the Creek Indians in the 1832 Treaty of Cusseta. The county was named in honor of John Randolph (1773-1833), a statesman from Virginia. The first settlers were mostly from Georgia and the Carolinas, and some of the earliest settlements and towns included Louina (no longer in existence), Roanoke, Wedowee, and Wadley.

The first county seat was at or near Hedgeman Triplett's Ferry (later known as Blake's Ferry) on the Big Tallapoosa River. In 1834, the county seat was moved to Wedowee, which means "rolling water" in Muscogee. Court was held in the open air until 1836, when a log courthouse was built. Between 1839 and 1841, Wedowee was known as McDonald. A brick courthouse replaced the log structure in 1857, but it was destroyed by fire in 1896, along with all its records. In 1897, a new courthouse was built, and additions were made to the building in 1937. This courthouse burned in 1940, but most of the records were saved. A modern courthouse, built in 1941, remains in use today.

Sitting on the Piedmont Plateau, Randolph County has relatively poor soil but a great deal of mineral wealth. Before the Civil War, farmers focused primarily on livestock and subsistence agriculture. Cotton became an important economic commodity in the 1860s and remained so until the mid-1940s. During the 1930s and 1940s, farmers diversified into poultry and commercial vegetables. Those crops, along with cattle and forestry, remain important today.

Although Randolph County sits on a great deal of mineral wealth, including gold, copper, mica, and kaolin, the high costs of mining proved prohibitive throughout the nineteenth century. Consequently, few mining operations were attempted in the twentieth century.

In the late 1920s, the Alabama Power Company began acquiring land along the Tallapoosa River to build hydroelectric dams. Although there were delays in the project, activity picked up in the 1960s and 1970s and in 1983, electricity from the R. L. Harris Dam project went online.

The county has a total area of 584 square miles, of which 580 square miles is land and 4 square miles (0.7%) is water. The population recorded in the 1840 Federal Census was 4,973. The 2010 census recorded 22,913 residents in the county.

Neighboring counties are Cleburne County, Alabama (north), Carroll County, Georgia (northeast), Heard County, Georgia (east), Troup County, Georgia (southeast), Chambers County, Alabama (south), Tallapoosa County, Alabama (southwest), and Clay County, Alabama (west).

Communities in the county include Roanoke, Wadley, Wedowee, Woodland, Graham, Morrison Crossroads, Rock Mills, Almond, Bacon Level, Corinth (north), Corinth (south), Dingler, Folsom, Hobson, Liberty Grove, Louina, and Newell.


 

Randolph County, Alabama Records

Alabama Genealogy & History Network has many records on our county websites. Thousands of County marriage records are located on the county websites. Many counties have cemetery listings. Please visit the county or counties of interest to you.

Birth Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains records of births from 1908 to present. This was the year Alabama began keeping official birth records. You can obtain official copies of birth certificates by visiting the birth record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official birth records before 1908 for births prior to that date you will need to determine birth information from census records, bible records, baptismal records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Death Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains death records after 1908 on file. This was the year Alabama began keeping official death records. You can obtain official copies of death certificates by visiting the death record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official death records before 1908 for deaths prior to that date you will need to determine death information from census records, bible records, funeral home records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Marriage Records - We have thousands of county marriage records on our county websites. These dates will assist you greatly in obtaining a copy of the original marriage license. The Alabama Department of Public Health can provide you with information for marriages that took place from 1936 to present by by visiting the marriage record page on their website and following the instructions.

All existing county marriage records for any date not listed above (and for the dates listed above for that matter) may be obtained from the county's Probate Office in which the marriage was held.

Divorce Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains divorce records from 1950 to present. You can obtain official copies of devorce records by visiting the divorce record page on their website and following the instructions. Records for divorces occuring before 1950 may be obtained from the Circuit Clerk in the county where the divorce took place.