Welcome to Montgomery County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network!

 

Welcome to Montgomery County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide free resources for genealogical and historical researchers.

To share your Montgomery County, Alabama genealogy or history information, send an email to alghn@outlook.com - we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information to share for other Alabama Counties, visit the Alabama Genealogy & History Network and go to the appropriate county.

Thanks for visiting and good luck with your research!

 



About Montgomery County, Alabama...

Montgomery County was created by an act of the Mississippi Territorial Legislature on December 6, 1816. The county was named in honor of Maj. Lemuel Montgomery of Tennessee, who was the first U.S. soldier killed in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The city of Montgomery is the county seat and was selected as the state's permanent capital in 1846. The county was carved out of Monroe County and originally encompassed a majority of central Alabama. It was later subdivided into Elmore, Bullock, and Crenshaw counties.

The act that created Montgomery County provided that its courts were to meet initially at Fort Jackson, located at the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers and site of the surrender of the Creek Indians to Gen. Andrew Jackson, in present-day Elmore County. The courts met there only until June 1818, after which they met in nearby Alabama Town, founded by Gen. John Scott, who with several other migrants from Georgia founded the town on the bluff of the Alabama River. The men abandoned it when a group from New England, led by Andrew Dexter, founded a nearby town in what is now the downtown area of Montgomery and named it New Philadelphia. Scott and his companions then built a new town they called East Alabama. Seeing themselves as rivals, the citizens of East Alabama contemptuously referred to New Philadelphia as Yankee Town. The bitter rivalry ended, however, when the towns merged on December 3, 1819, and incorporated as the city of Montgomery, just prior to Alabama being admitted as a state.

The city of Montgomery prospered and became the county seat in 1822 and Alabama's permanent capital in 1846. Although it bears the same name as the county, the city was named in honor of a different person, Maj. Gen. Richard Montgomery, who lost his life in the Revolutionary War in the assault against Quebec. The city and the county of Montgomery have been the site of many firsts, with the distinction of being known as the birthplace of the both the Civil War and the civil-rights movement. On February 18, 1861, Jefferson Davis was sworn in as the president of the Confederate States of America in its initial capital of Montgomery. It was from Montgomery that a telegram was sent to authorize the bombardment of Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, thus commencing the Civil War.

Ninety-four years later, on December 1, 1955, Montgomery played host to a defining event in the birth of the civil-rights movement when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a Montgomery city bus. Ten years later Martin Luther King Jr. ended the Selma-to-Montgomery March for voting rights with a speech delivered from the state capitol grounds.

Technological firsts were also achieved in Montgomery County. In 1886, the nation's first electric streetcar system was put into operation in Montgomery, and in 1910 the Wright Brothers founded the first flight school for aviators at a site near the Alabama River that would later become Maxwell Air Force Base. Orville Wright recorded the first powered flight in Alabama's history, the local press reporting that "a strange new bird soared over the cotton fields to the west of Montgomery, on March 26, 1910." This site later became an aviation repair depot and eventually evolved into a full-scale air base that today is home to Air University, the U.S. Air Force's center for professional military education.

The county has a total area of 800 square miles, of which 784 square miles is land and 16 square mile (2.0%) is water. The population recorded in the 1820 Federal Census was 6,604. The 2010 census recorded 229,363 residents in the county.

Neighboring counties are Elmore County (north), Macon County (northeast), Bullock County (east), Pike County (southeast), Crenshaw County (southwest), Lowndes County (west), and Autauga County (northwest).

Communities in the county include Montgomery, Pike Road, Ada, Boylston, Cecil, Currys, Dublin, Grady, Hope Hull, Lapine (partly in Crenshaw County), Le Grand, Mathews, McDade, Mount Meigs, Pine Level, Pintlala, Ramer, and Waugh.


 

Montgomery County, Alabama Records

Alabama Genealogy & History Network has many records on our county websites. Thousands of County marriage records are located on the county websites. Many counties have cemetery listings. Please visit the county or counties of interest to you.

Birth Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains records of births from 1908 to present. This was the year Alabama began keeping official birth records. You can obtain official copies of birth certificates by visiting the birth record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official birth records before 1908 for births prior to that date you will need to determine birth information from census records, bible records, baptismal records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Death Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains death records after 1908 on file. This was the year Alabama began keeping official death records. You can obtain official copies of death certificates by visiting the death record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official death records before 1908 for deaths prior to that date you will need to determine death information from census records, bible records, funeral home records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Marriage Records - We have thousands of county marriage records on our county websites. These dates will assist you greatly in obtaining a copy of the original marriage license. The Alabama Department of Public Health can provide you with information for marriages that took place from 1936 to present by by visiting the marriage record page on their website and following the instructions.

All existing county marriage records for any date not listed above (and for the dates listed above for that matter) may be obtained from the county's Probate Office in which the marriage was held.

Divorce Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains divorce records from 1950 to present. You can obtain official copies of devorce records by visiting the divorce record page on their website and following the instructions. Records for divorces occuring before 1950 may be obtained from the Circuit Clerk in the county where the divorce took place.