Welcome to Escambia County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network!

 

Welcome to Escambia County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide free resources for genealogical and historical researchers.

To share your Escambia County, Alabama genealogy or history information, send an email to alghn@outlook.com - we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information to share for other Alabama Counties, visit the Alabama Genealogy & History Network and go to the appropriate county.

Thanks for visiting and good luck with your research!

 



About Escambia County, Alabama...

Escambia County was created by an act of the Alabama State Legislature on December 10, 1868, from portions of Baldwin and Conecuh counties.

On July 27, 1813, the Battle of Burnt Corn Creek, one of the more significant battles of the Creek War of 1813-14, took place in what is now Escambia County. In July 1813, Peter McQueen, a Creek warrior of the Red Stick faction, secured a cache of weapons from the British and Spanish at what is now Pensacola, Florida. U.S. troops ambushed McQueen and the Red Sticks on the banks of Burnt Corn Creek but were then routed by a Red Stick counterattack. The Red Sticks considered the act a declaration of war and retaliated with the infamous Fort Mims Massacre. At the time of the battle, the site was part of Conecuh County; although the actual site has not been located, most sources now place it in Escambia County.

Fort Crawford was established in 1816 to monitor the activities of the Spanish in Florida and curb Creek Indian hostilities. The majority of the Creek Indians were removed in the 1830s, but the descendants of those who became known as the Poarch Creek remained on their tribal lands. The only federally recognized tribe in the state, they continue to live in and around their reservation in Poarch, where they operate a series of casinos.

In 1861, the town of Pollard was established at the juncture of the Alabama & Florida and the Mobile & Great Northern railroad lines. Steamboats once traversed the Conecuh River carrying cargo to and from Pollard. The town was, in its heyday, an important rail center and was a vital Confederate military post during the Civil War. In January 1865, Pollard was the site of a battle between Confederate troops under Gen. J. H. Clanton and a force of federal raiders. The town was later burned. One of the South's greatest train robberies happened near Pollard on September 2, 1890, when the notorious "Robin Hood of Alabama," Rube Burrow, forced the engineer to stop the train on the trestle across Big Escambia Creek. Burrows made his getaway but was trailed through Monroe County into Marengo County, where he was killed in a gun battle.

Brewton, the county seat, is the birthplace of the legend of Railroad Bill. Stories about Railroad Bill, an armed African American vagrant who rode the boxcars between Flomaton and Mobile, surfaced in 1895 along the tracks of the Louisville & Nashville line. The legend of Railroad Bill has been immortalized in song, theater, and fiction.

Atmore is home to the Poarch Band Creek Indian Reservation. Every November, the reservation hosts the Poarch Creek Band Indian Pow Wow. Every summer, the town of Brewton hosts its annual Blueberry Festival at Burnt Corn Creek Park. The Thomas E. McMillan Museum, located on the Brewton campus of Jefferson Davis Community College, includes displays relating to the culture, archaeology, and history of Escambia County.

The county has a total area of 953 square miles, of which 945 square miles is land and 8 square miles(0.8%) is water. The population recorded in the 1870 Federal Census was 4,041. The 2010 census recorded 38,319 residents in the county.

Neighboring counties are Conecuh County (north), Covington County (east), Okaloosa County, Florida (southeast), Santa Rosa County, Florida (south), Escambia County, Florida (southwest), Baldwin County (west), and Monroe County (northwest).

Communities in the county include Atmore, Brewton, East Brewton, Flomaton, Pollard, Riverview, Poarch Creek Indian Reservation, Canoe, Dixonville, Foshee, Freemanville, Huxford, Nokomis, Spring Hill, and Wahl.


 

Escambia County, Alabama Records

Alabama Genealogy & History Network has many records on our county websites. Thousands of County marriage records are located on the county websites. Many counties have cemetery listings. Please visit the county or counties of interest to you.

Birth Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains records of births from 1908 to present. This was the year Alabama began keeping official birth records. You can obtain official copies of birth certificates by visiting the birth record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official birth records before 1908 for births prior to that date you will need to determine birth information from census records, bible records, baptismal records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Death Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains death records after 1908 on file. This was the year Alabama began keeping official death records. You can obtain official copies of death certificates by visiting the death record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official death records before 1908 for deaths prior to that date you will need to determine death information from census records, bible records, funeral home records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Marriage Records - We have thousands of county marriage records on our county websites. These dates will assist you greatly in obtaining a copy of the original marriage license. The Alabama Department of Public Health can provide you with information for marriages that took place from 1936 to present by by visiting the marriage record page on their website and following the instructions.

All existing county marriage records for any date not listed above (and for the dates listed above for that matter) may be obtained from the county's Probate Office in which the marriage was held.

Divorce Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains divorce records from 1950 to present. You can obtain official copies of devorce records by visiting the divorce record page on their website and following the instructions. Records for divorces occuring before 1950 may be obtained from the Circuit Clerk in the county where the divorce took place.