Welcome to Butler County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network!

 

Welcome to Butler County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide free resources for genealogical and historical researchers.

To share your Butler County, Alabama genealogy or history information, send an email to alghn@outlook.com - we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information to share for other Alabama Counties, visit the Alabama Genealogy & History Network and go to the appropriate county.

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About Butler County, Alabama...

Butler County was created by an act of the Alabama Legislature on 03 December 1819. Carved from portions of Conecuh and Monroe counties, it was named for Captain William Butler, an early settler who died in a battle with Creek Indians in 1818. The first settlers came to the county via the Federal Road from Georgia and the Carolinas. Threatened by white settlement, Creek warriors attacked and killed two families in March of 1818 in what became known as the Ogly Massacre. Several days later, Butler was attacked and killed by Creek leader Savannah Jack and his band of warriors while traveling between Fort Dale and Fort Bibb, west of present-day Greenville. In response, local settler Thomas Gary built Fort Gary and charged settlers for protection within the stockade. Indignant over the fees, locals petitioned Governor William Wyatt Bibb for protection. He sent Colonel Samuel Dale, who along with settlers and militia constructed Fort Dale. After the Treaty of Fort Jackson, the Creeks were moved west of the Coosa River and additional settlers poured into the county. During the antebellum years, Butler County was known as the "Saratoga of South Alabama" for its mineral waters, with many guests staying at the Butler Springs Hotel in Butler Springs.

Prior to the Civil War, cotton farming was the main occupation in Butler County. During the 1850s lines along the Ohio and Mobile Railroad were constructed, making the county a major trading center. Greenville, the current county seat, was a railroad town and became the center of commerce between Montgomery and south Alabama. During the late nineteenth century, the construction of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad through Greenville contributed further to the town's success. At the turn of the century, Gulf Red Cedar Company and Factory in Greenville became a noted bucket manufacturing enterprise.

Known as the Camellia City for its beautiful flowers, Greenville contains numerous historic structures, including the Old City Jail, which is the oldest unaltered building in the county. The Commerce Street Residential Historic District as well as many other homes and commercial buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places. The Ridge, an antebellum plantation community, was constructed by wealthy residents to escape the diseases of the lowland areas. In addition to its historic homes, The Ridge is today home to a premier golf course, Cambrian Ridge, which is on the famed Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail. Greenville and Georgiana were once home to legendary country singer Hank Williams Sr.; his boyhood home in Georgiana is operated as a museum, and the city hosts its annual Hank Williams Festival each June. Each summer, Greenville hosts an annual Watermelon Festival. The historic Ritz Theater, a former movie palace, now serves as Greenville's performing arts center.

The county has a total area of 778 square miles, of which 777 square miles is land and 1.1 square miles (0.1%) is water. The population recorded in the 1820 Federal Census was 1405. The 2010 census recorded 20,947 residents in the county.

Neighboring counties are Lowndes County (north), Crenshaw County (east), Covington County (southeast), Conecuh County (southwest), Monroe County (west), and Wilcox County (northwest). Communities in the county include Greenville, Georgiana, McKenzie (partly in Conecuh County), Chapman, Forest Home, and Spring Hill.


 

Butler County, Alabama Records

Alabama Genealogy & History Network has many records on our county websites. Thousands of County marriage records are located on the county websites. Many counties have cemetery listings. Please visit the county or counties of interest to you.

Birth Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains records of births from 1908 to present. This was the year Alabama began keeping official birth records. You can obtain official copies of birth certificates by visiting the birth record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official birth records before 1908 for births prior to that date you will need to determine birth information from census records, bible records, baptismal records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Death Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains death records after 1908 on file. This was the year Alabama began keeping official death records. You can obtain official copies of death certificates by visiting the death record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official death records before 1908 for deaths prior to that date you will need to determine death information from census records, bible records, funeral home records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Marriage Records - We have thousands of county marriage records on our county websites. These dates will assist you greatly in obtaining a copy of the original marriage license. The Alabama Department of Public Health can provide you with information for marriages that took place from 1936 to present by by visiting the marriage record page on their website and following the instructions.

All existing county marriage records for any date not listed above (and for the dates listed above for that matter) may be obtained from the county's Probate Office in which the marriage was held.

Divorce Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains divorce records from 1950 to present. You can obtain official copies of devorce records by visiting the divorce record page on their website and following the instructions. Records for divorces occuring before 1950 may be obtained from the Circuit Clerk in the county where the divorce took place.