Welcome to Bullock County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network!

 

Welcome to Bullock County, Alabama Genealogy & History Network. Our purpose is to provide free resources for genealogical and historical researchers.

To share your Bullock County, Alabama genealogy or history information, send an email to alghn@outlook.com - we will be pleased to include it here. If you have information to share for other Alabama Counties, visit the Alabama Genealogy & History Network and go to the appropriate county.

Thanks for visiting and good luck with your research!

 



About Bullock County, Alabama...

Bullock County was created by an Act of the State Legislature on December 5, 1866. Carved out of parts of Macon, Pike, Montgomery, and Barbour counties, it was named for Alabama native and Confederate colonel E. C. Bullock.

Like much of southeastern Alabama, Bullock County was once the home of the Creek Indians. During the Treaty of Fort Jackson in 1814, the Creeks ceded 23 million acres of land in Alabama and Georgia to the U.S. government. The boundary of the lands ceded by the Creeks ran across present-day Bullock County from northeast of Mitchell Station to southeast of Pine Grove. Following Alabama statehood and Creek Indian Removal in the 1830s, settlers began pouring into present day Bullock County. The richness of the soil in the area made it highly conducive to cotton production and the county quickly became one of the richest in the state.

During the nineteenth century, Bullock County was the center of the cotton industry. The rich soils of the Black Belt were excellent for cotton farming, and Bullock County became one of the wealthiest counties. The Civil War and the boll weevil devastated the industry by the early twentieth century, however. As cotton production declined, farmers attempted to diversify with other crops such as corn and alfalfa. In addition, exhausted agricultural lands were sold for use as bird-dog training and hunting lands.

Bullock County is home to several antebellum historic homes including the Bonus-Foster-Chapman House, childhood home of Alabama Civil Right's activist Virginia Foster Durr, and the McCaslan-Garner House. In 2003, Trinity Episcopal Church in Union Springs was converted into the Red Door Theater.

The county has a total area of 625 square miles, of which 623 square miles is land and 2.3 square miles (0.4%) is water. The population recorded in the 1870 Federal Census was 24,474. The 2010 census recorded 10,914 residents in the county.

Neighboring counties are Macon County (north), Russell County (northeast), Barbour County (southeast), Pike County (southwest), and Montgomery County (west). Communities in the county include Union Springs, Midway, Blues Old Stand, Fitzpatrick, Inverness, Perote, Smut Eye (sometimes Smuteye), and Thompson.


 

Bullock County, Alabama Records

Alabama Genealogy & History Network has many records on our county websites. Thousands of County marriage records are located on the county websites. Many counties have cemetery listings. Please visit the county or counties of interest to you.

Birth Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains records of births from 1908 to present. This was the year Alabama began keeping official birth records. You can obtain official copies of birth certificates by visiting the birth record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official birth records before 1908 for births prior to that date you will need to determine birth information from census records, bible records, baptismal records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Death Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains death records after 1908 on file. This was the year Alabama began keeping official death records. You can obtain official copies of death certificates by visiting the death record page on their website and following the instructions. Since there are no official death records before 1908 for deaths prior to that date you will need to determine death information from census records, bible records, funeral home records, cemetery tombstones, etc.

Marriage Records - We have thousands of county marriage records on our county websites. These dates will assist you greatly in obtaining a copy of the original marriage license. The Alabama Department of Public Health can provide you with information for marriages that took place from 1936 to present by by visiting the marriage record page on their website and following the instructions.

All existing county marriage records for any date not listed above (and for the dates listed above for that matter) may be obtained from the county's Probate Office in which the marriage was held.

Divorce Records - The Alabama Department of Public Health maintains divorce records from 1950 to present. You can obtain official copies of devorce records by visiting the divorce record page on their website and following the instructions. Records for divorces occuring before 1950 may be obtained from the Circuit Clerk in the county where the divorce took place.